Violent teenage dating relationships Shat asrael g erl s and cam

17-Sep-2019 07:16

When it comes to teen dating violence, boys are more likely to report being the victim of violence—being hit, slapped, or pushed—than girls.

That's the surprising finding of new research from the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University.

Abuse in a dating relationship can be confusing and frightening at any age.

But for teenagers, who are just beginning to date and develop romantic relationships, this abuse can be especially difficult.

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"Young people who experience dating violence are more likely to act out and take unnecessary risks, and they're also more likely to experience depression or think about or attempt suicide," Shaffer said.

This will often be coupled by instances of jealousy, coercion, manipulation, possessiveness and an overall threatening demeanor, many times increasing in severity as the relationship continues.

Dating violence can affect people from all socioeconomic, racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds, and occurs in heterosexual, gay, and lesbian relationships.

Overall, fewer teens are experiencing physical abuse from their dating partners, with five per cent of teens reporting dating violence in 2013, down from six per cent in 2003. student from SFU who was involved in the study, says more research is needed to understand why boys are reporting more dating violence.

However, the researchers found 5.8 per cent of boys and 4.2 per cent of girls said they had experienced dating violence in the past year. "It could be that it's still socially acceptable for girls to hit or slap boys in dating relationships," she said.

"Young people who experience dating violence are more likely to act out and take unnecessary risks, and they're also more likely to experience depression or think about or attempt suicide," Shaffer said.

This will often be coupled by instances of jealousy, coercion, manipulation, possessiveness and an overall threatening demeanor, many times increasing in severity as the relationship continues.

Dating violence can affect people from all socioeconomic, racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds, and occurs in heterosexual, gay, and lesbian relationships.

Overall, fewer teens are experiencing physical abuse from their dating partners, with five per cent of teens reporting dating violence in 2013, down from six per cent in 2003. student from SFU who was involved in the study, says more research is needed to understand why boys are reporting more dating violence.

However, the researchers found 5.8 per cent of boys and 4.2 per cent of girls said they had experienced dating violence in the past year. "It could be that it's still socially acceptable for girls to hit or slap boys in dating relationships," she said.

DOI: 10.1177/0886260518788367 Citation: Teen dating violence is down, but boys still report more violence than girls (2018, August 29) retrieved 1 September 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-08This document is subject to copyright.