Risk factors for dating violence

23-Oct-2019 23:24

Understanding these multilevel factors can help identify various opportunities for prevention.

Violence in teen dating relationships is alarmingly commonplace.

This article provides a critical review of the research literature with respect to risk factors for both perpetrators and victims of dating violence and examines the research on the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs.

Risk factors have been defined as "attributes or characteristics that are associated with an increased probability of [its] reception and/or expression" (Hotaling & Sugarman, 1990 p. Risk factors are correlates of dating violence and not necessarily causative factors.

Especially encouraging is a program demonstrating long-term behavioral change.

Clearly the prevention of dating violence requires a commitment (both financial and otherwise) with the goal of establishing a consistent, coordinated, and integrated approach in every school and community.

However, there are risk factors that your teen may be violent.

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A number of school based programs focusing on reducing violence in teen dating relationships and promoting healthy respectful relationships show promising results.At-risk groups for teen violence Some groups are more likely than others to engage in youth violence.If you teenager is part of one of these groups, he or she is at a higher risk for committing acts of violence against others, or being a victim of teenage violence (1): Additionally, female teens are more likely, at 12 percent, to be forced into having sexual intercourse, a form of sexual or date violence, than their male counterparts (at six percent) (2).These rates are higher when verbal abuse is included in the definition.Teen dating violence appears to parallel violence in adult relationships in that it exists on a continuum ranging from verbal abuse to rape and murder (Sousa, 1999).

A number of school based programs focusing on reducing violence in teen dating relationships and promoting healthy respectful relationships show promising results.At-risk groups for teen violence Some groups are more likely than others to engage in youth violence.If you teenager is part of one of these groups, he or she is at a higher risk for committing acts of violence against others, or being a victim of teenage violence (1): Additionally, female teens are more likely, at 12 percent, to be forced into having sexual intercourse, a form of sexual or date violence, than their male counterparts (at six percent) (2).These rates are higher when verbal abuse is included in the definition.Teen dating violence appears to parallel violence in adult relationships in that it exists on a continuum ranging from verbal abuse to rape and murder (Sousa, 1999).Here are the teen violence risk factors associated with the family and home situation (2): Risk factors for teen violence at school The school environment can also contribute to an increased risk of violent behavior in your teen.