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31-Dec-2019 11:11

Over the years, Benziger has recognized thirty-one distinct microclimates within that circle-- each contributing it's own particular qualities to the final blend of his wine.

Biodynamism dictates that man work within nature's boundaries rather than bend it to his own will.

This, of course, is a dictum impossible to follow since agriculture is essentially a system created by man to exploit and propagate that nature which serves him best and eliminate--or at least exclude-- that which does not.

Those rabid enough to adhere to such a strict construction would be reduced, in my opinion, to hunting and gathering.

He began his talk by asking us about various alcoholic beverages. Wine just might be the poster child for this approach to agriculture-- a mingling of living and dead matter that, if you will forgive me for saying, creates its own life force, therby enhancing our own.

Unless, I thought, one drinks excessive amounts of it and dies of alcohol poisoning, I reminded myself that biodynamism is about cosmic balance and the thought passed.

Sounds very much like our modern, and fortunately blossoming, organic agricultural movement.

Of course, such laws also illustrate an equally French no non-sense approach to what fuels these qualities-- wine. Biodynamism was, we thought, similar to organic winemaking, only more hippie-like. It might be hippie-like, but it is definitely worth taking seriously.

All we knew at the time was that biodynamic winemaking had something to do with the full moon. My boss kept asking if various items around the restaurant -- it could have been a chair or a dog for all he cared-- were . It is a category of biodynamic agriculture, which is essentially an organic farming system based primarily upon eight lectures on anthroposophy given by Rudolph Steiner in Germany in 1924.

Even in 1924, when man's faith in better living through chemistry was picking up speed, Steiner was convinced that the quality of food was being degraded by the use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides.

It does sport a rather intriguing symbol directly under the name Demeter. I must add here that I am talking about a room full of people who have, at one time, more or less rejected California Cabernet Sauvignons and blends thereof as showy and often juvenile-- an embarrassment to be around.

Being the strong fertility goddess she was to the Greeks, I am not certain if the symbol represents some sort of budding plantlife or not. Not that they all are, but more in the spirit of rejecting one's parents as an embarrassment in one's teenage years.

Of course, such laws also illustrate an equally French no non-sense approach to what fuels these qualities-- wine. Biodynamism was, we thought, similar to organic winemaking, only more hippie-like. It might be hippie-like, but it is definitely worth taking seriously.All we knew at the time was that biodynamic winemaking had something to do with the full moon. My boss kept asking if various items around the restaurant -- it could have been a chair or a dog for all he cared-- were . It is a category of biodynamic agriculture, which is essentially an organic farming system based primarily upon eight lectures on anthroposophy given by Rudolph Steiner in Germany in 1924.Even in 1924, when man's faith in better living through chemistry was picking up speed, Steiner was convinced that the quality of food was being degraded by the use of artificial fertilizers and pesticides.It does sport a rather intriguing symbol directly under the name Demeter. I must add here that I am talking about a room full of people who have, at one time, more or less rejected California Cabernet Sauvignons and blends thereof as showy and often juvenile-- an embarrassment to be around.Being the strong fertility goddess she was to the Greeks, I am not certain if the symbol represents some sort of budding plantlife or not. Not that they all are, but more in the spirit of rejecting one's parents as an embarrassment in one's teenage years.The borders between natural and farmed areas eventually merge and begin to speak, as Benziger says, "the language of Here's where the moon comes in. Everything in the universe, according to the Ancients, was comprised of some combination of these elements.