Editorial internet dating

12-Sep-2019 09:05

But instant messaging, chat rooms, emails and social networking sites can also bring trouble - from cyberbullying to more serious Internet dangers, including exposure to sexual predators.

How savvy are you about keeping your child or teenager safe online?

The Cyber Tipline helps prevent sexual exploitation of children by reporting cases of kids enticed online to do sexual acts.

While sexual predators have targeted children in chat rooms, they migrate to wherever young people go online, Shehan says.

More predators are now scouring social networking sites, such as My Space and Xanga, because these sites have centralized so much information, Shehan says.

A child's profile typically includes photos, personal interests and blogs.

"If you get the monitoring software, put it on the computer and forget that it's there," Aftab says.

Recently, cyberbullies have also begun posting humiliating videos of other kids they dislike, says Parry Aftab, a cyberspace security and privacy lawyer who also serves as executive director of Wired Safety.org, one of the largest Internet safety education groups in the world.In the age of You Tube, a website that hosts videos shot by users, "Kids are looking for their 15 megabytes of fame," Aftab says. If it's a one-time thing, try to ignore the bully and block future contact, she says."They do it to show that they're big enough, popular enough, cool enough to get away with it." Often, kids don't tell parents they're being cyberbullied; they're afraid their parents will overreact or yank Internet privileges, Aftab adds. But if the cyberbullying involves any physical threat, you may need to call the police.And cyberbullies don't witness their victims' reactions, the way they might if they insulted others to their faces."They don't see you crying," Handy says, which may make it easier for them to continue.

Recently, cyberbullies have also begun posting humiliating videos of other kids they dislike, says Parry Aftab, a cyberspace security and privacy lawyer who also serves as executive director of Wired Safety.org, one of the largest Internet safety education groups in the world.In the age of You Tube, a website that hosts videos shot by users, "Kids are looking for their 15 megabytes of fame," Aftab says. If it's a one-time thing, try to ignore the bully and block future contact, she says."They do it to show that they're big enough, popular enough, cool enough to get away with it." Often, kids don't tell parents they're being cyberbullied; they're afraid their parents will overreact or yank Internet privileges, Aftab adds. But if the cyberbullying involves any physical threat, you may need to call the police.And cyberbullies don't witness their victims' reactions, the way they might if they insulted others to their faces."They don't see you crying," Handy says, which may make it easier for them to continue.You can view the Internet browser history to see which websites your child is visiting, Shehan says.