Dating spode tower

10-Nov-2019 04:00

Felspar porcelain has a glass like finish which made the china very popular at the time.Spodes New Stone  " data-medium-file="https://antiquedetective.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/20121008_193020.jpg? w=274" data-large-file="https://antiquedetective.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/20121008_193020.jpg? w=274" class="alignright size-full wp-image-15" title="Spodes New Stone" src="https://antiquedetective.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/20121008_193020.jpg?Please visit my page The Spode Archive for On this page, below, you will find links to my relevant blogposts about finding out about your Spode and Copeland pieces.You may find that you can do this yourself from these links. You can also find examples of backstamps illustrated on my my Spode ABC where you find all sorts of Spode history information.From 1847 – 1970’s the company was owned by the Copeland family and as such pieces were often stamped Copeland Spode, but some were just marked as Copeland.Spode has used hundreds of different styles of stamps and marks during its long history, there have been over seventy-five thousand different patterns recorded.Information about Spode and Copeland history can be found in the large Spode archive which is deposited at the Stoke on Trent City Archives.

dating spode tower-17

On modern china and pottery pattern names or numbers are often printed on the base here we have the company name then written underneath “New Japan Stone” which refers to the product that is going into the mix to produce the china they were also at the time imitating Chinese and Japanese porcelain.

J – January, F- February, M-March, A-April, Y-May, U-June, L-July, T-August, S-September, O-October, N-November, D-December.

For example A74 would be made in April 1874 Spode Felspar Porcelain mark " data-medium-file="https://antiquedetective.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/20121008_192849.jpg?

Spode Salmon Dish c.1820 printed in Castle pattern. Robert donated it to the Trust where it remained in storage until its recent rediscovery.

There may be a Spode title allocated to this pattern but until this is known the title given by Robert Copeland of “Foreign Port” remains. Spode Tall Dutch Jug, c.1820, printed in Tower pattern, 30cm high. Tissue pull — ‘Foreign Port’ pattern Underglaze printed marks in blue on the reverse of the Foreign Port dish Spode Low Dutch Jug in Caramanian pattern, c.1820. London Shape Breakfast Cup and Saucer in Trophies —Etruscan pattern, c.1820.

On modern china and pottery pattern names or numbers are often printed on the base here we have the company name then written underneath “New Japan Stone” which refers to the product that is going into the mix to produce the china they were also at the time imitating Chinese and Japanese porcelain.J – January, F- February, M-March, A-April, Y-May, U-June, L-July, T-August, S-September, O-October, N-November, D-December.For example A74 would be made in April 1874 Spode Felspar Porcelain mark " data-medium-file="https://antiquedetective.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/20121008_192849.jpg?Spode Salmon Dish c.1820 printed in Castle pattern. Robert donated it to the Trust where it remained in storage until its recent rediscovery.There may be a Spode title allocated to this pattern but until this is known the title given by Robert Copeland of “Foreign Port” remains. Spode Tall Dutch Jug, c.1820, printed in Tower pattern, 30cm high. Tissue pull — ‘Foreign Port’ pattern Underglaze printed marks in blue on the reverse of the Foreign Port dish Spode Low Dutch Jug in Caramanian pattern, c.1820. London Shape Breakfast Cup and Saucer in Trophies —Etruscan pattern, c.1820. Different designs were used on different shaped items; the ’Indian Sporting’ series alone has 21 different hunting scenes based on engravings in a monthly publication ’Oriental Field Sports’ by one Edward Orme of Bond Street, London. This interesting dish was rediscovered when the contents of the Reserve Collection at the Spode Museum was being packed to send away for storage at the time of closure of the Spode factory.